Electronic Design/BIM

Computer-Aided Design 2 (GSU Fall 2012)

BIM Revit Interior Design Polling ID4350 Computer Aided Design 2, is the second in a series of three electronic design courses required by the Interior Design program at Georgia State University.  This class continues the exploration of how multiple computer software programs can be used to communicate design intent.  We focus primarily on Autodesk Revit for building modeling and analysis, while the Adobe Creative Suite is used for presentation purposes.  Students are also encouraged to incorporate their previous skills with programs like SketchUp, AutoCAD, and others.  In CAD1, the students learn basics of using AutoCAD and Revit for design communication including a fundamental understanding of how interior designers can leverage Building Information Modeling concepts in their work.  This class builds upon that knowledge by looking at how Revit can be used for conceptual exploration through massing, building analysis through solar studies and walk throughs, renderings, and custom component creation.

Capitalizing on the excitement of the 2012 presidential election season as well as the controversy surrounding perceptions of voter suppression, I had the students design small, temporary polling places that could be assembled on sites that were either far from existing polling locations or were serving a unique population.  Click here for a look at the full project brief.  The students first researched sites based on need and then developed aesthetic and function concepts through hand sketching.  The hand sketches were translated into conceptual masses using Revit.  Options were considered, and a design finalized.  This design solution included a custom component family and was visualized using renderings and walk throughs.  Crucial to the deliverable was manipulating the photo-realistic Revit renderings into a composition that spoke to the project’s concept as well as the designer’s voice.  The students also produced solar studies of their designs, showing how the sunlight and shadows would impact the use of their design at their chosen geographic location.

All of their efforts in design and analysis of the temporary polling place were compiled into final composition (see slideshow below), the design and size of which was determined by their project. The goal of this composition was to show the iterative process and analysis used in developing this small project.

BIM Revit Interior Design

Compiled Board 6

BIM Revit Interior Design

Compiled Board 2

BIM Revit Interior Design

Compiled Board 4

BIM Revit Interior Design

Compiled Board 3

BIM Revit Interior Design

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Compiled Board 1

Compiled Board 1

Using an actual project — however small in scope — that is unique to the CAD lecture class, as opposed to working supplementary to a concurrent studio class project has proven successful.  I have found that the students possess a willingness to be much more experimental with techniques when they are not fearful of taking a risk on a more complex studio project.  Using a small project like the temporary polling place allows the students to quickly move through the design process so that they are able to see how these technical tools can be used throughout the process.

ID4350 Syllabus Fall 2012

For more information about specifc assignments, sample class demos, and more student work examples, please visit the Class Blog.

Commercial

Commercial Interior Design Projects

From September 2005 – September 2010, I worked as an Interior Project Designer at the Atlanta office of Perkins+Will.  During this time I worked on a variety of project types, with an emphasis on projects in the Science & Technology market sector.  While at PW, I helped form the Atlanta office Design Technology Leaders program which identified individuals within the office who excelled in their use of technology for design and project delivery.  This group met annually with counterparts across the firm to leverage knowledge, held office-wide training and information sessions, and offered specific project support, usually in the form of Building Information Modeling (BIM) management.  My early adoption of Autodesk Revit and BIM skills positioned me to collaborate across project teams and disciplines, implementing BIM strategies as a means of design communication and analysis.  Below, are highlighted some of the projects on which I had the opportunity to work including a brief description of my contribution and responsibilities.  Please follow the link (project headings) to view additional imagery and information.

Darden Restaurant Support Center

As a member of the interior design team for the project, I assisted in developing the design of the main cafeteria servery, ceiling design, and coordination with kitchen consultants. I also collaborated closely with all members of the design team, determining strategies and coordinating building information modeling standards for what would become the Atlanta office’s  first, large-scale, multidisciplinary Revit project.

McKinsey & Company

 This project included the renovation and expansion of private and open office areas on two floors of the multi-floor Atlanta office of McKinsey & Company.  Additional services included breakroom additions and renovations as well as coordination and design of a telepresence conferencing room. As a member of the design team, I was involved in this project from schematic design through project completion.  This 10,000sf corporate renovation was the first stand-alone Interior Design project delivered in Revit by Perkins+Will Atlanta. As a designer on this project, I was responsible for client presentation visuals, finish and furniture selection (including demountable partitions), and construction administration. This space explores new ways to promote collaboration and flexibility while still maintaining some necessary hierarchy. Revit walk-throughs and imagery fostered a willingness in the client to be open to new ideas and solutions as a departure from their typical office design.

 Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation

The Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) is a non-profit, bio-medical research organization in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. As a member of the interior design team on this interdisciplinary project, I coordinated interior design elements with outside consultants, architects, and landscape architects. Striving for LEED Gold Certification, our team generated sustainable design solutions for the public areas as well as the Biosafety Level 2 lab spaces. Sustainable design strategies implemented in the interior design include polished concrete flooring, finishes with low VOC adhesives and high recycled content, and daylight maximizing ceiling designs. My work on this project also included collaborating with graphic designers to create a proposal for branding elements in the building that would not only provide wayfinding but also tell the inspiring story of OMRF’s work.


National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center

One of only a handful of Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) labs in the United States, the NBACC is run by the Department of Homeland Security to research and analyze bioterror threats. The interior design and architecture for this building had to respond to a myriad of technical and security requirements. Meeting these requirements and providing a safe, healthy, and pleasant work environment were key drivers for the interior design of the space. As a member of the interior design team I engaged with other designers, engineers, and contractors to provide lobby and public space design as well as design for some lab and lab support spaces.

Autotrader.com

In 2010, Perkins+Will Atlanta designed the interior for Autotrader.com’s 400,000 sf headquarters.  The client enthusiastically embraced Building Information Modeling technology for this project, with the intent on integrating the design Revit model into their facility management system. This expectation elevated the need for a robust and accurate Building Information Model delivered by the design, construction, and engineering team.  Adding to the complexity was a phased delivery of the project and a fast-track schedule.  My responsibilities included BIM management for the design team, coordinating with consultants and the contractor, and identifying challenges and  strategies for meeting the client database needs.  Additionally, I was responsible for coordinating and combining the design and engineering consultants’ efforts for the building’s full service employee cafeteria.

National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility

NBAF will be a state of the art research facility located in Manhattan, Kansas, managed by the Department of Homeland Security “for the study of foreign animal, emerging and zoonotic (transmitted from animals to humans) diseases that threaten the U.S. animal agriculture and public health.”  The design, engineering, and construction team for this very complex project included numerous firms and their agents which made proactive BIM management a necessity.  As an interior designer on the project, I worked closely with other designers and architects to develop the building’s public spaces as well as provide space planning for the office areas and some research laboratory zones.  Additionally, I served as the interior design BIM manager coordinating with my counterparts at Perkins+Will and across the multiple firms and agencies involved with the project.

King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences

The Biomedical Research Building at the Riyadh campus was designed to attract the brightest minds in the biomedical research industry. This building will have a cornerstone placed by the King and will combine technical research with a regal, modern, and comfortable environment. My primary responsibilities on this project included collaboration on design of public areas and lab breakout spaces, finish selection, and the creation of design presentations using 3D Studio Max and Revit.

 

 

 

 

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — Building 106

 

Completed in 2007,  Building 106 is located at the Chamblee campus of the CDC in Atlanta, Georgia.  I worked collaboratively with other interior designers and architects on this project including execution of design documentation.  One of my primary responsibilities was the design and coordination of the visitors’ center which is used for credentialing and security screening of all visitors to the campus.

 

Additional Design Experience:

NO Architecture

While pursuing my MFA, I engage part time with Tim Nichols’s NO Architecture in Atlanta assisting with furniture specifications, as-built documentation, and other interior design services.

Revit Consultation

I currently provide on-call Building Information Modeling support and project delivery strategy consultation to Pimsler Hoss Architects in Atlanta, Georgia.

Installation

(ir)rational

Color Tape Mural exploring a rational and aesthetic based pattern making process.

Aqua12, Miami Beach, Dec 04-09, 2012



Sometimes the design problem is obvious, while at other times, discovering the problem is the problem. I hope to find solutions that answer these problems in the simplest, most straight forward, and sustainable manner, considering, above all else, an environment that elevates the end user experience. Finding a balance between a rational, iterative approach, while still considering an emotional reaction drives my work and research interests. I’m obsessed with less, yet at the same time, find value in meaningful environments that encourage exploration.

These objectives have led me to seek ways of generating design solutions that look to rational processes such as pattern development and analysis, but also inquiry into the less tangible, emotional aspects of space.

My goal with this installation is to activate a space by generating a pattern design using the building information modeling design software, Revit, based on a set of rules interjected with aesthetic choices. I wanted to explore the tension between a purely rational, rule‐based system for generating a design pattern with instinctive aesthetic choices. In other words, how can rules and parameters be altered to change the pattern’s outcome to activate a space more dynamically? The tendency of the software is to create a very regular, systematic design, and it was only by inventing new rules and changing the parameters that the pattern broke down to create the moments of interest and movement necessary for an engaging experience. This software is used to create projects – magnificent buildings full of quantifiable data. In this experiment, I challenged the complexity of a powerful design tool to create a relatively simple output which could be applied at multiple scales to change and activate a space.

The string of images above showcase the process used to develop the pattern which which was installed at Aqua 2012 during Miami’s Art Week.  Using 18 different colored tapes, the goal of the installation was to activate the gallery suite while attracting passersby.  Below are some images highlighting the installation process as well as a time lapse video of the final installation.

timelapse from Cotter Christian on Vimeo.

 

 

Installation Design

Installation Design

Using only paper, students were given the challenge of designing an sensory installation piece for the underground passageways between terminals at Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International airport.

One of the goals for this study model was to explore how sound can be incorporated into design, providing an enveloping sensory experience.  Working in teams, the students chose a song that they felt would be soothing to anxiety riddled passengers, and analyzed the overall mood and feeling of the song, looking for design inspiration.

The next phase required the students to consider light and form that related to the auditory experience creating a cohesive designconcept for the immersive installation experience.

Scale study models were built and used holiday lights and flashlights to create different illumination effects.

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Collaborative Studio Retail Design

Retail Design Collaborative Project

As a means of exploring cross-disciplinary collaboration as well as gain an understanding of potential client-designer relationships, Interior Design students were paired with 4th year students from SCAD’s Fashion Management department.  Together the teams of two were charged with developing retail design concepts and executing those design ideas in the graphic language of the space and the interior environment. Fashion management students executed business plans, budgets, site requirements, and set the overall goals for the store while working with the interior designers to develop design strategies and concepts.

I have implemented this project in multiple courses, making adjustments to the process each time through professional collaboration and feedback from faculty in the Fashion Design and Management departments.  Remaining constant, however, are the kick-off and interim design charettes, where the interior design students are able to work with the fashion management students to educate them on the process of interior design as well as learn successful design communication skills outside of the final project presentation format.

This project has also been used for teaching some aspects of working drawings by assigning coordinated casework detailing, reflected ceiling plans, elevations, and floor plans.

The project concludes with a presentation to a jury of retail and design professionals by both the management and interior design student.

Design Charette

Design Charette

Design Charette

Design Charette

Design Charette

Design Charette

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Final Presentation

Final Presentation

Research Student Work Thesis

Relating Relational Aesthetics to the Praxis of Interior Design

NO, GLOBAL TOUR, Santiago Sierra

As a major theme in the literature review for my MFA thesis, I have been reading and contemplating the art theory, Relational Aesthetics, coined by Nicolas Bourriaud in the late 1990s.  Bourriaud, a curator of exhibitions focused on highly interactive art works published his theory in 1998 in French which wasn’t translated into English until 2002.  Bourriaud used the term, relational aesthetics to refer to the interactive art of the 1990s, installation examples that were often included in exhibits he curated.  His ideas sought to distance these works from that of previous contemporary, post-modern art stating instead that the work of relational aesthetics is not in a “position outside the dominant culture”(Ross, 2006) like the Situationists, Dadaists, and others.  “We find ourselves, with relational artists, in the presence of a group of people who, for the first time since the appearance of conceptual art in the mid sixties, in no way draw sustenance from any re-interpretation of this or that past aesthetic movement” (Bourriaud, 2002, p. 44). Bourriaud saw the main goal of relational aesthetics as “learning to inhabit the world in a better way, instead of trying to construct it based on preconceived idea of historical evolution” (Bourriaud, 2002, p. 13).  The relations between people, in this case spectators or visitors to an exhibit of relational aesthetic work, are the most important aspect of this movement.  Less focus was placed on the aesthetic outcome of the project while the emphasis was on relations created by the work.  The work itself is less a creation of the artist and more a collaboration among participants.  To that end, sometimes identifying the artist behind the work is difficult as the work of truly relational aesthetics relies heavily on collaboration.

Bourriaud focused much of his book’s attention on the work of Rikrit Tiravanija and Felix Gonzalez-Torres, both world renowned contemporary artists.  While the author cited other artists whose work is representative of relational aesthetics, “there are really only two artists whose work consistently supports Bourriaud’s thesis: Reirkrit Tiravanija and Gonzalez-Torres and of those two only Tiravanija can be described as thoroughly ‘relational’” (Coulter-Smith, 2009). Their work, especially that of Tiravanija, whose early installations included cooking and serving Pad Thai in a gallery, exemplify Bourriaud’s relational aesthetic ideals by creating a collaborative and interactive environment for both artist and viewer.  While this work may epitomize Bourriaud’s intent behind classifying it as relational aesthetics, it also clarifies the potential failures of his theories.  Claire Bishop, in her article Antagonism and Relational Aesthetics, noted that “Tiravanija’s microtopia gives up on the idea of transformation in public culture and reduces its scope to the pleasures of a private group [of gallery visitors]”(Bishop, 2004, p. 69) She cited the more politically dynamic work of Santiago Sierra and Thomas Hirschhorn as perhaps being more profound and meaningful examples of relational aesthetics.

Bourriaud’s assertions and assumptions regarding this art movement are met with other criticism, notably that the ability to objectively critique the work is complicated by the lack of “criteria against which we may evaluate its success” (Bishop, 2004, p. 63). Bourriaud focused the emphasis of successful relational aesthetic work on the quality of the relationships it fostered.  This creates a problem in quantifiable measurement and analysis, and ultimately begs to question what is the value of these relationships, and why?  Since the work of relational aesthetics typically appear within a gallery setting, they attract an audience pre-disposed to appreciating art, or at least willing to pay to visit a gallery.  The relationships created by art serving this audience seems highly limiting if, as previously mentioned, Bourriaud’s intention is to learn to “inhabit the world in a better way.” Instead, we are perhaps only learning how art enthusiasts interact with each other when faced with an interactive work of so-called relational aesthetics. This does not, in my opinion, produce an outcome that is meaningful to the greater good.

So, what can all of this mean for the interior designer seeking to explore new ways that interior spaces can foster human relationships, while “learning to inhabit the world in a better way.?”  In order to move forward with the hypothesis that the concepts behind relational aesthetics might be applied to the praxis of interior design, I’ve decided to break down my understanding of this movement – and its criticism — into topics for further exploration.

Key concepts behind Relational Aesthetics:

  1. Interdisciplinary – relational aesthetics considers ideas, mediums, and fields outside of “traditional” fine art.  A particularly interesting example of this is Mark Dion’s Tate Thames Dig an exhibition that combines archaeological excavation practices with art installation.
  2. Ephemera – the ‘art’ of relational aesthetics exists of the moment and its form is a result of the collaboration among viewers, the work, and at times the artist herself.
  3. The Everyday – relational aesthetics works within existing systems regardless of their banality to expose new ways of relating
  4. Use over Product/Function over Form – “the interactive (political) use-value of an artwork tends to be advocated over its value as a contemplative (aesthetic) object” (Downey, 2007, p. 272).
  5. Interaction – “the essence of humankind is purely trans-individual made up of bonds that link individuals together in social forms” (Bourriaud, 2002, p. 18).  Impromptu, mini social exchanges have been hijacked by machines like ATM’s which reduce the size and amount of social space in society (Bourriaud, 2002, p. 17).  Furthermore, as these automated exchanges compartmentalize social relations, it becomes the artists’ purpose to become “a quasi-social worker – an individual who glues together the intellectual branches and communicational fallouts that underwrite contemporary interrelations” (Downey, 2007, p. 270).
  6. Democratization of Experience — “We discover that art of the 1990’s is a micro political form of resistance to the reification and alienation evident in capitalist corporate culture” (Coulter-Smith, 2009).  It would appear that the goal of relational aesthetics is one of a liberal democracy, bringing together disparate elements into a whole, as reflected in the ideas that neither the artist, the work, or the viewers are part of a rigid hierarchy, but are instead all on equal footing (Coulter-Smith, 2009).

While there are undoubtedly, other concepts that Bourriaud may have been hoping to communicate in his definition of relational aesthetics, in my research, it was these topics that appeared most often, either referred to by critics or presented by Bourriaud himself.  Admittedly, there are many criticisms as to whether or not “true” relational aesthetic work successfully accomplishes the goals set out within these themes, but these topics do lend themselves to a parallel analysis of concepts relevant to an interior design thesis.  For instance, looking through the lens of interdisciplinary work, ID and relational aesthetics share an intrinsic quality of combining multiple disciplines into their projects and end results.  In his “archaeological” dig, Mark Dion needed a programmatic analysis to understand the functional processes involved with archaeology in order to generate a meaningful collaborative experience. In this case, the art was a display in a gallery, but more importantly, it was an activity, and relied on a careful analysis and understanding of the processes of archaeology to make for a realistic endeavor and installation.

Extending the comparison further, as mentioned above, relational aesthetics also addressed the relationship between use over end product or, in archi-speak, function over form.  Bourriaud saw this as a reflection of the larger societal transition from a goods-based to service-based economy, but this balance has been one that designers of the built environment have been wrestling for decades. While the importance within relational aesthetics focused on the experience of the art and its interactions, it’s interesting that it sometimes occurred at the expense of aesthetic quality.  Meanwhile, it is noted that aesthetics can provide an important counter point to institutionalization and the fragmentation of capitalism (Ross, 2006, p. 169), so the notion that the experience is valued over the aesthetics may be overstated.  The struggle between the value of form and function as conceptual drivers is inevitable in the built environment as well.

It’s also important not to overlook the connection between interior design and relational aesthetics’ focus on interactions and the latter’s namesake, “relationships.”  While a myriad of factors influences the design of interior space, perhaps one of the most important is how our surroundings influence our encounters with others.  This is usually evaluated through proxemics and other theories of personal space and privacy, but perhaps there is an opportunity to relate the ideals of relational aesthetics to our studies and understanding of human interrelations within the built environment.

The aforementioned connections has currently led me to consider other ways in which art and design of the built environment have been merged, or how art movements have influenced the design of habitable space. I’ve focused this exploration on interactive art such as performance art.  Of note and under current review is the collaborative work between the architect, Bernard Tschumi, and the performance artist, RoseLee Goldberg, in the 1970s which led to the formation of the London Conceptualists. Not unlike the artists of relational aesthetics, Golberg and Tschumi focused on use over end product by exploring how performance art could provide focus in designing buildings for how they would be occupied by people and the events that would take place within.

Having explored these ideas, and with the understanding that there continues to be much to research, refine, and explore, I end with some topics for consideration:

Can relational aesthetics be used as a catalyst to foster relationships in interior environments where social interaction has been fractured by technology interventions?

How can an interactive installation challenge viewers’ perception of an interior environment, providing new consideration of space and the human relations they support. 

Commercial Design Graphics Multimedia Student Work

Sweet Auburn Market + GSU

The Fall semester 2011 graduate seminar at GSU was attended by both Graphic and Interior Design students.  We were given the task of creating one (or more) projects addressing the Auburn/Edgewood Avenue area near downtown Atlanta including the Sweet Auburn Curb Market. The intent was to raise awareness of this area and bring publicity and attention to the Market.  The district, as well as the market, have been cornerstones of area’s history, but neglect and a bisecting interstate system effectively disconnected them from the redevelopment occurring around the Georgia State campus, downtown Atlanta, and Old 4th Ward. The Atlanta Streetcar, under construction at the time of this post, offers a unique opportunity for revitalization of this area and a potential boost for the Market with a stop directly outside.

The beginning of the class was dominated by researching and touring the area, analyzing similar projects, and generally getting a sense of the latent  potential for this part of Atlanta.  I was particularly enamored by the well documented history of the area, and gravitated towards the founding of Hurt Park as well as the rich history of Streetcars in this area.  By reviewing articles from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution archive, the GSU photo archive, as well as the Atlanta Time Machine site I was able to show my classmates a time when this area was full of promise and opportunity.  Of course, there was a broad distance between the white and black experience in Atlanta’s history, but despite these differences, this area afforded a forward looking attitude at different periods in history for different groups.

Today, Hurt Park is bordered by the ever-expanding campus of GSU, and yet its dormant fountain remains a symbol of neglect.  On nice days you’ll find a few students gathered to read or play, but the limited seating and lack of maintenance does not provide an inviting environment.  The Sweet Auburn Curb Market, despite being only blocks from GSU classrooms and dorms, feels miles away as abandoned buildings and lack of street activity keeps students on the opposite side of Piedmont Avenue.  Recently, however, the market has been adding new vendors, developing relationships with popular Food Trucks, and undergoing renovations as a way to attract a more diverse customer base from the surrounding neighborhoods.

Working with MFA Graphic Design student, Jessica Mullis, we developed a multi-tiered design proposal to solidify the market’s relationship with GSU culminating with a celebration at Hurt Park.  Our proposal consisted of three parts:  1) attract students to the market,  2) celebrate and advertise student activity at the market, and 3) expand the market’s physical reach beyond its current location.

Attracting Students to the Market

Inspired by the grid-like and colorful patterns found in aerial photography of farm lands, we developed a series of street chalk art installations that would serve to intersect and create buzz about the market along popular student routes near and on campus.  The patterns would be created by using the existing architectural grids found within the built environment (panels on the side of a building, score marks in a sidewalk, etc.) The chalk would be temporary and the locations could change throughout the campaign.  Each chalk installation would include the tag line “@ it’s your market,” establishing a sense of market ownership for the students and making reference to the market’s Twitter page that was included in our proposal.

Farmland Inspiration Image

Farmland Inspiration Image

Farmland Inspiration Image

Farmland Inspiration Image

Farmland Inspiration Image

Farmland Inspiration Image

Map Indicating Possible Chalk Installation Locations

Map Indicating Possible Chalk Installation Locations

Chalk Installation Example

Chalk Installation Example

Building Chalk Installation near Freshman Dorm

Building Chalk Installation near Freshman Dorm

Chalk Installation Example at Subway near Market

Chalk Installation Example at Subway near Market

Chalk Installation at Bridge to Classroom South

Chalk Installation at Bridge to Classroom South

Chalk Installation at Student Center

Chalk Installation at Student Center

Celebrate and Advertise Student Activity at the Market

During our design discussions, we were drawn to how students, particularly those from the Millenial Generation, are drawn to using social media to advertise every aspect of their lives.  Often going to a place is less about the experience of being at that unique place and more about “checking-in” or “tagging” oneself (or friends) at that place.  Daily experiences become an archive on Facebook, Twitter, FourSquare and other sites; defining what and who one is.  We wanted to capitalize on this phenomenon as a way to advertise student involvement at the market. To do so, we created a “Twitter Bench” within the market that will automatically photograph people who sit on the bench and post it to the market’s Twitter page (@ItsYourMarket).  Designed with elements from the farmland inspired chalk drawings,  The Twitter Bench would become a focal point in the market and a destination for students encouraging them to celebrate their experience at the market by posing for fun and goofy photos (not unlike the popularity of  renting photo booths for weddings and parties).  Additionally, the archive of photos on the Market’s website and Twitter feed would celebrate the diversity of customers and encourage followers and virtual visitors. Digital “crawls” incorporated in the background of the bench area would showcase text based-live feeds from the Market’s Twitter site.

Twitter Bench Photo Example

Twitter Bench Photo Example

Sweet Auburn Market Existing Conditions

Sweet Auburn Market Existing Conditions

Sweet Auburn Market Existing Conditions

Sweet Auburn Market Existing Conditions

Sweet Auburn Market Existing Conditions

Sweet Auburn Market Existing Conditions

Twitter Bench Location

Twitter Bench Location

Bench Design Process Sketch

Bench Design Process Sketch

Bench Design -- Interior

Bench Design -- Interior

Bench Design -- Exterior View

Bench Design -- Exterior View

Twitter Bench Photo Example

Twitter Bench Photo Example

Twitter Bench Photo Example

Twitter Bench Photo Example

Twitter Bench Photo Shoot

Twitter Bench Photo Shoot

Twitter Bench Photo Example

Twitter Bench Photo Example

Twitter Bench Photo Example

Twitter Bench Photo Example

@It's Your Market on Twitter

@It's Your Market on Twitter

Sweet Auburn Market New Splash Page

Sweet Auburn Market New Splash Page

Sweet Auburn Market

Sweet Auburn Market "It's Your Market" Page

Sweet Auburn Market Site with Added Chalking and Festival Content

Sweet Auburn Market Site with Added Chalking and Festival Content

Expanding the Market’s Physical Reach

Historically, Hurt Park was home to popular festivals, political speeches, and other events.  Few organizations today use the park to this extent, and rarely is there activity after dark.  In the past, the fountain was the proud centerpiece of the park, and it produced a magical light that brought visitors from all over to view its nightly displays.  Capitalizing on Hurt Park’s proximity to both the Sweet Auburn Market and Georgia State University, we proposed that the culmination of the “@ It’s Your Market” campaign would be a farmers’ market music festival in Hurt Park.  This event would bring vendors to the park, musicians, students, and others from the surrounding community.  A key component of the festival would be large scale building projections which would hearken back to the light display spectacle of the fountain. These artistic projections would us the building’s surrounding Hurt Park as canvases and extend the market’s reach beyond their physical location, and expand the park’s use after nightfall.

Hurt Park Postcard Featuring Fountain at Night

Hurt Park Postcard Featuring Fountain at Night

Hurt Park Circa 1949

Hurt Park Circa 1949

Hurt Park Today

Hurt Park Today

Festival Map Legend

Festival Map Legend

Festival Map

Festival Map

Festival Graphics

Festival Graphics

Festival Street Banners

Festival Street Banners

Projection Behind Fountain

Projection Behind Fountain

Tulip Projections on United Way Wall

Tulip Projections on United Way Wall

Projections on Alumni Hall

Projections on Alumni Hall

Projections on School of Art + Design Building

Projections on School of Art + Design Building

This class project was well received by the jury and was presented to the director of the Market and displayed within the market for current visitors, employees, and vendors.

Chalk Installation Board

Chalk Installation Board

Web Presence Board

Web Presence Board

Hurt Park Festival Board

Hurt Park Festival Board

Residential Studio Teaching

Residential Studio Class – Spring 12

In the spring of 2012 I taught my first residential studio at SCAD-Atlanta.  Having a previous professional background almost exclusively in commercial design at Perkins+Will, I will admit that undertaking a residential studio was a bit intimidating.  In the end, it was one of the most rewarding and enriching experiences I’ve had teaching thus far.  The students were talented and motivated, and showed great creativity. This class is their first proper design studio in the interior design program at SCAD.  A residential project provides them with an environment in which to design which is most familiar to them.

One of the challenges I gave myself, and ultimately the students, was to question the typical ways in which we use a home.  I started this dialogue by assigning a series of readings addressing the idea of “place” and trying to define “home.” We also looked at Christopher Alexander’s, A Pattern Language as an easily accessible means of considering alternative design solutions for the home. We were also given a great tour of two homes designed by Staffan Svenson of Dencity (images below).

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Where would their designs occur? In order to promote creative thinking, I did not want the students to use a building shell that was necessarily intended for residential occupancy.  Buildings for single or multi-family residences are designed in such a way that I was concerned would limit the flexibility of the student solutions.  Perhaps relying on my comfort zone in commercial interiors, I chose the 32nd floor of 1075 Peachtree Street, an office tower in Midtown Atlanta.
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The students were given a tour of the shell space that would eventually contain their individual units.  The building tour and following neighborhood walkabout provided content for the development of a preliminary site analysis.

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Back in the classroom, students were randomly assigned client genders, family size, and one or two defining, unique characteristics. They answered a number of client profile questions and wrote relatively comprehensive narratives about their imaginary clients.  Much to the students’ dismay, upon turning in their narrative for “grading,” I immediately and randomly distributed their clients to other students.  I used this method to ensure that they were not creating clients as a means of directing design. They were permitted to ask questions of the client author throughout the quarter.

Using the client narratives, needs, and wants, the students generated programs which considered size, location, and assigned each area an intimacy gradient.  These programs were then translated to layout diagrams, prototypicals, and eventually block diagrams. At this point the students were divided into groups of 4 and required to negotiate where they wanted to design their units within the overall floor plate.

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Concurrent to space planning the students were also developing a conceptual language for their space.  Initial ideas were conceived through mind mapping exercises, and then later students selected imagery to support their ideas:

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Conceptual imagery quickly led to volumetric studies through sketching and study models as well as preliminary floor plans.

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Final Presentations included material and furniture selections, measured hand rendered perspective, rendered floor plans, and conceptual imagery. Students also compiled design notebooks which included a detailed furniture schedule, sketches, anthropometric analysis of an area receiving custom millwork, and a short design brief. Students were also required to produce a small set of construction documents by hand which included floor plans, furniture plans, finish plans, elevations, select details, and ceiling plans.

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In order to showcase the iterative process evidenced in this studio project, I created a series of panels in the main corridor of the Interior Design department.  The intent was to show, in a somewhat organized way, how the chaos of the design process can be harnessed to produce unique and beautiful end products.

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Design Residential

Candler Park Kitchen Renovation

Completed in 2011, the owners of this historic home in Atlanta’s Candler Park neighborhood were looking to update the functionally challenging layout of the kitchen and den area.

The goal was to connect the two spaces with each other as well as the backyard area.  This was accomplished by removing a den close to add space in the kitchen, relocating the electrical circuit box to the basement, and opening up the corridor between the den and the exterior of the home.  Exterior connectivity was enhanced by adding glass double doors to the outside deck as well as an over sized window above the sink area.

While the style of the kitchen is not traditional, the colors compliment the home’s overall palette, and the trim and moldings are designed to match the existing conditions. The relatively high ceilings in this space were broken down by adding soffits above the counters and bar, providing opportunities for task and ambient lighting variation.

Counter material is a quartz composite solid surface, offering a clean, bright, and easy-to-maintain solution, and a nice contrast to the stone backsplash.

A custom banquette was designed for the breakfast nook, which has quickly become the new center of the home. The banquette fabric was chosen to soften the otherwise rectilinear planes and became an inspiration for the accent blue color found in the ceiling and CB2 chairs.

The contractor for the project was Bill Parks of Parks and Son Construction.

 

Project Photos

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Process Imagery and Design Drawings

Preliminary Kitchen Rendering

Preliminary Kitchen Rendering

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Preliminary Rendering - View Towards Entry

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Preliminary Rendering - From Den

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Preliminary Rendering - From Seating Area

Preliminary Rendered Floor Plan

Preliminary Rendered Floor Plan

Revised Kitchen Rendering

Revised Kitchen Rendering

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Revised Rendering - From Den

Revised Rendering - Ceiling Above Seating

Revised Rendering - Ceiling Above Seating

Floor Demolition and Leveling

Floor Demolition and Leveling

Demo at Corridor and Seating Area

Demo at Corridor and Seating Area

Demolition and Relocation of Electrical Box

Demolition and Relocation of Electrical Box

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Drywall at Kitchen

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Drywall from Seating Area

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Drywall at Seating Area

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Rough-in of Sink Window

Demo Floor Plan

Demo Floor Plan

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Reflected Ceiling Plan

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Banquette Enlarged Plan

Banquette Enlarged Plan

Banquette Details

Banquette Details

Commercial Design Student Work

the beacon center

Dr. John Decker’s Art History seminar during the Spring 2012 semester at Georgia State University examined “the various approaches to death at play in Western Europe during the period 1300-1600.”  Through thought provoking readings and in-class discussions, themes surrounding death in Early Modern Europe were continuously contrasted with current societal views and traditions surrounding death. Through the lens of historical context I was able to better understand our present day rituals surrounding death and how the visual culture reinforces and reflects these ideas. 

Recognizing that this graduate class was attended by students from various disciplines within the School of Art + Design — not solely Art History students — Dr. Decker required a final project proposed by the individual student, aligned with their field of study.  The core requirements for these projects were that they respond to the “broad topics of death” and be of a quality suited for a juried exhibition or conference.

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For my project, I chose to focus on how dying is different among socioeconomic classes by highlighting the need for end of life care in homeless and indigent communities. Through reflecting on the seminar readings, it is evident that class has always played a significant role in death rituals. My goal for the project was to conduct preliminary research as means of understanding the need for hospice care among homeless Atlantans and study how a space could be adapted to treat these people suffering from terminal illness in a respectful, accessible, and appropriately ceremonial manner. I called the project the Beacon Center, as the building’s glowing beacon (figure 1) was a design driver that would make the public aware of the need for this treatment as well as offering a beacon of hope to an otherwise outcast community.

The Beacon center would provide hospice, palliative care to homeless individuals in the Atlanta community.  My proposed location for the center would be located within one mile of existing homeless resources, including Grady Memorial Hospital.  The proposed site is also located directly across from the Atlanta Medical Center offering convenience to staff, physicians, and other medical services (figure 2).

Current end of life care for homeless individuals, when provided, is typically administered in a hospital setting at great cost or within an inadequately equipped shelter.  The center would offer this community a peaceful facility to quietly rest, with minimum pain, while suffering from imminently terminal illnesses.  Referrals would come directly from hospitals, shelters, churches, and walk-ins.

Through my research, I learned that a large portion of hospice care is covered my Medicaid and Medicare, which would offset some of the cost for maintaining this facility.  Additional funding may also come from private and corporate donations, government aid, and potentially other medical centers who would see this facility as a means of cutting down on high cost extended stay palliative care.

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End of life planning in the homeless community is severely lacking despite a desire for these types of services. Many homeless individuals have little trust in large institutions, and worry about how they would be treated if suffering from a terminal illness or the post-mortem treatment of their bodies. One study from the Annals of Internal Medicine, conducted in 2010 showed that a “common concern [among homeless individuals] was the final disposal of their body, a fear that appears unique to this population; they believed a homeless, disenfranchised person’s body would be anonymously cremated, buried in a common grave, or used in medical experimentation.” As additional outreach to the community, the center would also provide an end of life walk-in counseling center where individuals from the street could plan their wills and advance care directives. These would then be filed with local hospitals in the hope of ensuring that the individual’s needs and wishes are fulfilled.

In order to maintain credibility as well as successfully solicit private donations, the design of the center would be aesthetically pleasing.  Conversely, the center must not be alienating to the target homeless demographic so as to prevent their willingness to receive care due to a perceived lack of trust in the institution.  A design language advocating for the inclusion of natural elements will be used throughout the space by providing access to natural light and vegetation.  Additionally, the center would provide intimate areas for reflection, ritual ceremony, as well as memorial, the latter two which are crucial in creating a meaningful death experience while providing a connection to the community at large. This ceremonial experience will manifest itself in the design through a strong central corridor connecting a garden under a skylit glass atrium at the rear of the building with a monumental exterior lantern, illuminating the night street and acting as a beacon to the community.

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